Thomson & Craighead’s Belief

Thomson and Craighead are premiering their new documentary artwork, ‘Belief’ as part of the Edinburgh Film Festival. It’s the final work in the Flat Earth Trilogy following on from Flat Earth (2007) and A short film about War (2009/2010), and will be shown at Inspace, Edinburgh from 21st June – 1st July 2012. e-flyer: http://www.thomson-craighead.net/belief

In other news, Thomson and Craighead have donated a print for an Animate Projects fundraiser aiming to help keep the brilliant Animate Projects archive online. So if you fancy donating to the cause and walking away with an artists’ print, then do go along on Wednesday 13 June, 6.30-8.30pm, Berners House, 47-48 Berners Street, London. Email: tarnia@animateprojects.org for more information about this.

Finally, work by Thomason and Craighead is also appearing in two group shows: ‘Image Counter Image’ at the Haus der Kunst, Munich, 10th June 2012 – 16th September 2012; and ‘Gateways: Art & Networked Culture’, Haus für elektronische Künste, Basel, 2nd June 2012 – 19th August 2012.

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Soho Poly Theatre Festival, June 19th-21st

Soho Poly Theatre Festival
40th anniversary celebrations

19-21 June, 2012

2012 marks 40 years since The Soho Poly Theatre (now Soho Theatre) moved into a tiny basement on Riding House Street and established itself as one of the most famous fringe venues of the 1970s and 80s. It was the home of innovative new writing, and a launch pad for many actors and directors still at work today. Under the early directorship of Fred Proud and Verity Bargate, the theatre inspired incredible devotion amongst those it worked with. It was also a pioneer of ‘lunchtime’ theatre, an innovation which liberated writers to experiment with new forms of dramatic writing. From 19-21 June, the theatre will be coming back to life for a series of short plays, readings and panel discussions about theatre then and now.

Tuesday 19 June, 7pm: Fred Proud, the Soho Poly Theatre’s first artistic director, will introduce the festival, followed by a reading of Robert Holman’s short play ‘Coal’.

Wednesday 20 June: The festival hosts The Miniaturists, who will present three twenty minute plays at 1pm and again at 7pm. There will also be a panel discussion on innovative theatrical forms with representatives from the current Soho Theatre, time TBC.

Thursday 21 June, 1-2pm: ‘Theatre Then and Now’ – a lunchtime conversation with Michael Billington, Michael Coveney and Irving Wardle.

Thursday 21 June, 7pm: An evening reading of David Edgar’s play ‘Baby Love’, followed by a drinks reception in a nearby venue, TBC.

Unless otherwise mentioned, all events will take place in situ in the original basement at 16 Riding House Street: http://g.co/maps/uev2w

Please email festival organiser Matthew Morrison at matt.morrison77@gmail.com for any further information about the individuals and companies involved, interviews and photos. Tickets are free, but because of the size of the venue, availability is limited. Please email sohopolyfestival@gmail.com for all reservations, mentioning which events you are interested in attending. You can also follow the festival on our blog http://sohopolyfestival.blogspot.co.uk/ and Twitter @SohoPolyFest.

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“Rorschach Audio – Art & Illusion for Sound” Book Release

“Rorschach Audio – Art & Illusion for Sound” by Joe Banks – “The earliest form of sound recording technology was not a machine but was written language…” (page 96)

What are the connections between Leonardo da Vinci and Dick Whittington, between the BBC Monitoring Service and punk band The Clash, between wartime military intelligence work, visual arts theory, battle management systems, Spiritualism, radio and recording technology and criminal witness testimony? What role do JG Ballard, Osama bin Laden, William Burroughs, Jean Cocteau, Jean Genet, Adolf Hitler, William Hogarth, Victor Hugo, Joe Meek, Pope Pius XII, Primo Levi, proto-Surrealist writer Raymond Roussel, teenage criminal Derek Bentley, Sigmund Freud and crystallographer Louis Albert Necker play in the disentangling of mysteries of human perception?

“Rorschach Audio” is a work of contemporary cultural scholarship and an exploration of the art and science of psychoacoustic ambiguities. Part detective story, part artistic and cultural critique, “Rorschach Audio” lifts the lid on an array of fascinating and under-examined perceptual and political phenomena.

“Rorschach Audio” is essential reading for everyone interested in air-traffic control, anechoic chambers, artificial oxygen carriers, audio art, bell-ringing, cocktail parties, cognitive science, communications interference, compost, the death penalty, Electronic Voice Phenomena, evolutionary biology, experimental music, ghosts, the historiography of art, illusions of sound and illusions of language, lip-reading jokes, nuclear blast craters, predictive texting, singing hair, sonic archives, sound design, steam trains, tinnitus, the Turing Test, Victorian blood painting, visual depth and space perception, ultrasonic visual music, ventriloquism, voices and warehouse fires and robberies.

Trade distribution by Turnaround
Production by Strange Attractor
Published by Disinformation

ISBN 978-1-907222-20-7
Hardback, 191 pages
UK £10 Non-Fiction
Psychoacoustics, Art Theory

RELEASE DATE MONDAY 21st MAY 2012

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Thomas Y Levin seminar at the IMCC, Weds 6 June

Wednesday 6th June 2012, 4pm
Room 358, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2UW

Professor Thomas Y. Levin
Princeton University / IKKM Bauhaus University, Weimar

“Ghostly Surveillance: Some Stabs in the Ciné-Narratological Dark”

Simultaneous with the increasingly widespread use of surveillance as a narrative device in contemporary cinema – its most obvious manifestation being the rise of so-called “real-time” transmission characteristic of CCTV systems in films such as The Truman Show — we are also witnessing a curious proliferation of ghosts within the surveillant machinery, from disturbing videocasettes desposited mysteriously on doorsteps (Lost Highway, Caché) to the re-appearance of people who are supposedly dead on the screens of corporate security systems (Michael Almereyda’s Hamlet [2000]) and the documentation of the presence of demons by means of home surveillance cameras (Paranormal Activity).  While it could be argued that at least since Bentham, there has always been a ghostly dimension to surveillance (the panoptic tower functions despite the complete inability to determine whether anyone is actually really inside), what might these ghostly apparitions reveal about the assumptions we make about surveillance images, indeed about cinema as such?

Thomas Y. Levin teaches media theory and history, cultural theory, intellectual history, and aesthetics. His essays have appeared in October, Grey Room, New German Critique, Screen, The Yale Journal of Criticism, and Texte zur Kunst. He translated and edited the critical edition of Siegfried Kracauer’s The Mass Ornament: Weimar Essays (1995). He was part of the curatorial collective responsible for the first exhibition on the Situationist International at the Centre Pompidou, ICA London and the ICA Boston in 1989. Levin also conceived and curated the exhibition CTRL [SPACE], Rhetorics of Surveillance from Bentham to Big Brother which opened at at the ZKM Center for Art and Media Technology in Karlsruhe in October 2001 and edited the catalogue under the same title (with Ursula Frohne and Peter Weibel). His more recent curatorial activities include Anxious Omniscience: Surveillance and Contemporary Cultural Practice (Princeton University Art Museum, 2002), 911+1: The Perplexities of Security (Watson Institute, Brown University, 2002) and The Arts of the Future will be Radical Transformations of Situations, or They will be Nothing’: Guy Debord Cineaste (Slought Foundation, Philadelphia, 2006).

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Narratives of Suburbia Programme Announced!

Narratives of Suburbia

Friday 15th June 2012, 9.15am – 5.15pm
Room 354, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London

Programme attached here: Narratives of Suburbia Programme[1]

Entrance is FREE but space is limited so please book your place in advance by contacting the organisers, Christopher Daley (daleyc@westminster.ac.uk) and Aisling McKeown (A.Mckeown@westminster.ac.uk).

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Important Notice: China in Britain #1, May 10th: Change of Venue

China in Britain #1. Film
Thursday May 10th 2012, 10.00 am – 6.00 pm

An important message from the organisers: because of our support for UCU Strike Action on May 10th, the venue has been transferred from the University of Westminster to The Brunei Gallery, School of Oriental and African Studies, Thornhaugh St., Russell Square, London WC1H OXG: http://www.soas.ac.uk/gallery/

The first in a series of colloquia organised as part of China in Britain: Myths and Realities, an AHRC-funded research network project to investigate changing conceptions of China and Chineseness in Britain, and based at Westminster. The colloquia will connect up the important yet disparate work being done by cultural historians, literary critics, curators, archivists, contemporary artists, film makers and Sino-British organisations. In bringing these specialists together, the project aims to provide a high profile platform for the discursive elaboration of the changing terms of engagement between British and Chinese people and to widen the terms of debate from diaspora studies and simplistic reductions around identity to an inter-disciplinary network of research practice relevant to contemporary debate.

Participants include: Ross Forman (University of Warwick); Felicia Chan (University of Manchester) and Andy Willis (University of Salford); Jo Ho (filmmaker). The day will end with Guo Xiaolu introducing a screening of her film She, A Chinese, followed by a Q and A.

RSVP – Places are free but strictly limited so it is essential to register with the project’s Principal Investigator, Anne Witchard, at: anne@translatingchina.info

WEBSITE:  http://www.translatingchina.info

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Now! Visual Culture, NYU, May 31-June 2, 2012

Following on from the pleasures of the 2010 Visual Culture Studies conference organized by the Institute for Modern and Contemporary Culture and hosted at University of Westminster, London, the International Association for Visual Culture’s first biennial conference will be taking place at New York University from May 31st – June 2nd.

Contributors include:

Dena Al-Abeeb, Safet Ahmeti, Katherine Behar, Wafaa Bilal, Maxime Boidy, Shane Brennan, Giuliana Bruno, Lisa Cartwright, Jill Casid, Dean Chan, Alexandra Chang, Patty Chang, Hazel Clark, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, Beth Coleman, David Darts, Craig Dietrich, Ellen Esrock, Jessica Freedman, GB Tran, Bernard Dionysius Geoghegan, Jennifer Gonzalez, Jaleen Grove, Elizabeth Guffey, Raiford Guins, Gary Hall, Natalie Jeremijenko, Alexandra Juhasz, Elizabeth Koslov, Max Liljefors, Mark Little, Kevin Matz, Meerkat Media Collective, Keith Miller, Nicholas Mirzoeff, W.J.T. Mitchell, Naeem Mohaiemen, Stephen Monteiro, Tara McPherson, Sina Najafi, Lisa Nakamura, Amy Ogata, the OWS Student Debt Campaign, Trevor Paglen, Amanda du Preez, Martha Rosler, Joan A. Saab, Marquard Smith, Landon van Soest, Marita Sturken, Francesca Martinez Tagliavia, Thomas Tsang, Magda Szczensniak, Diana Taylor, Oyvind Vagnes, Carlin Wing, Jason Wing, McKenzie Walk, and Joanna Zylinska.

So it should be pretty decent.

You can find out more information on the conference here:

http://www.visualculturenow.org/

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Transdisciplinary Problematics workshop, May 17-18 2012

From our friends at the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP), Kingston University

Workshop – Transdisciplinary Problematics
Anti-humanism and Gender Studies
17-18 May 2012, London

This two-day workshop will examine the notion of a transdisciplinary problematic, via the cases of anti-humanism and gender studies. The first day will approach theoretical anti-humanism from the standpoint of its destructive effect upon disciplinary fields in the humanities and as a radical problematisation of the discipline of philosophy in particular. The second day will focus on gender studies as a transdisciplinary problematic and on the transdisciplinary nature of the concept of gender itself. Topics will include the historical reconstruction of ‘gender’ as a boundary-crossing concept; the relation of its conceptual content to its functioning as a general concept across disciplines; the transformation of the disciplines in the humanities by ‘gender’ and gender studies; and the current productivity of ‘gender’.

Day 1: Anti-humanism
17 May 2012, 10.00–18.00
Bolivar Hall, 54 Grafton Way, London WC1

Introduction: Peter Osborne & Eric Alliez (CRMEP, Kingston University)
Etienne Balibar (Philosophy, University of Paris X/Irvine)
‘Anti-Humanism, and the Question of Philosophical Anthropology’
Respondent: Patrice Maniglier (University of Essex)
Nina Power (Philosophy, Roehampton University/Royal College of Art)
‘Is Antihumanism Transdisciplinary?’
David Cunningham (English, University of Westminster)
‘Intersciences, Philosophy and Writing’
Respondent: Simon Morgan Wortham (English, Kingston University)

Day 2: Gender Studies
18 May 2012, 10.00–18.00
Large Common Room, Goodenough College, Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N

Introduction: Stella Sandford (CRMEP, Kingston University)
Tuija Pulkkinen (Women’s Studies, University of Helsinki)
‘Disciplinarity and Transdisciplinarity in Gender Studies’
Sara Heinamaa (Philosophy, University of Helsinki)
‘Sex, Gender and Embodiment: A Critique of Concepts’
Elsa Dorlin (Political Science, University of Paris VIII)
title tba
Ken Corbett (Psychotherapy & Psychoanalysis, New York University)
‘The Transforming Nexus: Psychoanalysis, Social Theory and Queer Childhood’
Respondent: Lynne Segal (Psychosocial Studies, Birkbeck, London)

The event is free, but registration is essential at the following website: http://workshopthree.eventbrite.com/

Further information and background texts, go to: http://fass.kingston.ac.uk/activities/item.php?updatenum=1962

Other enquiries: S.Sandford@kingston.ac.uk

This is the third public workshop of the AHRC-funded project ‘Transdisciplinarity and the Humanities: Problems, Methods, Histories, Concepts’
2011–2013 (AHRC 914469)

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Narratives of Suburbia conference

Narratives of Suburbia

Friday 15th June 2012, 9.15am – 5.15pm
Room 354, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London

Programme: Narratives of Suburbia Programme[1]

The Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies at the University of Westminster is delighted to host the 17th Westminster Colloquium  entitled ‘Narratives of Suburbia’ on Friday 15th June 2012. The colloquium aims to assess contemporary representations of suburbia in British and North American fiction, with a particular focus on the exponential growth of suburbia since the Second World War and the fictional offshoots it has produced. By exploring the work of Anglo-American authors, the objective is to identify thematic and stylistic areas of convergence and  divergence.

Speakers:
John Beck (Newcastle)
Christine Berberich (Portsmouth)
Professor Neil Campbell (Derby)
Mark Clapson (Westminster)
Martyn Colebrook (Hull)
Martin Dines (Kingston )
Nick Hubble (Brunel)
Rupa Huq (Kingston)

Entrance is FREE but space is limited so please book your place in advance by contacting the organisers, Christopher Daley (daleyc@westminster.ac.uk) and Aisling McKeown (A.Mckeown@westminster.ac.uk). Full programme to follow. 

Th

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The Display and Interpretation of Technology colloquium

Wednesday 16 May 2012, 6.30 – 8.30 p.m.
The Boardroom, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2UW

The Smithsonian-Westminster Colloquium invites you to a discussion forum with Dr Peter Jakab, Associate Director, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Washington DC

Other contributors include: Andrew Nahum, Senior Curator in Aviation, Science Museum, London; David Hendy, Professor of Media History, University of Westminster.

Peter Jakab is Associate Director for Collections and Curatorial Affairs and curator of World War I Aviation at the National Air and Space Museum.  His publications include Visions of a Flying Machine: The Wright Brothers and the Process of Invention (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1990); The Published Writings of Wilbur and Orville Wright (Smithsonian Institution Press, 2000; co-edited with Rick Young); and The Wright Brothers and the Invention of the Aerial Age (National Geographic Society, 2003; co-authored with Tom Crouch). At NASM he has curated numerous exhibitions, including The Wright Brothers and the Invention of the Aerial Age, which opened in 2003.

Open and free. No booking required, but RSVP appreciated.
Further information and RSVP: Helena Scott, email H.Scott@westminster.ac.uk

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PhD Opportunities at Westminster


Social Sciences Humanities and Languages Studentships

The School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Languages at the University of Westminster is pleased to offer three research studentships for prospective PhD students from September 2012 for three years.

The Studentships are for full-time study in any of the School’s six Departments and include a fee waiver (Home/EU rate), plus a £5000 maintenance grant per year, for a maximum of three years. Please note that only Home/EU students are eligible to apply.

As part of the scholarship terms successful candidates will be required to contribute to teaching and research activities (up to 60 hrs per year), for which mentoring and development support will be provided.

Deadline for applications is 5pm on Friday 1 June 2012.

If your are applying for the English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies research area, your application will also be considered for the English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies Studentship and you do not have to submit two separate applications.

English, Lingusitics and Cultural Studies Bursaries

The Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies at the University of Westminster is pleased to offer three bursaries for prospective PhD students.

Applications are invited for awards which are tenable for up to three years for full-time study (pro-rata both in amount and length for part-time students). Please note that only home/EU students are eligible to apply

English Literature after 1800

Areas of staff expertise include: the literature and culture of the nineteenth century, the gothic, modernism, the avant-garde, Scottish writing, modern poetry, life writing, contemporary fiction, critical theory, aesthetics, the literature of London.

Museums and Galleries in the 21st century

To consolidate the postgraduate community of our MA Museums, Galleries, and Contemporary Culture, taught in partnership with Tate and Museum of London, the department would welcome prospective PhD students with a particular interest in developing projects on audiences, digital culture, and curating.

Based in the heart of London, the department has an active research culture which includes regular seminars and conferences, and a lively research student community. In addition to this, staff and PG students are part of the University’s Institute for Modern and Contemporary Culture.

For further information please contact:
Dr Leigh Wilson, PhD Coordinator
Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies
32-38 Wells St, London W1T 3UW

T: +44 (0)20 7 911 5000 Ext 2365
E: wilsonl@westminster.ac.uk

Deadline for applications is 5pm on Friday 1 June 2012.

Please note that your application will also be considered for the SSHL Studentship and they you do not have to submit two separate applications.

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Postcards from another person’s reality

A great article on the BBC website about Alexa Wright’s A View for Inside. Here’s a snippet: `A View From Inside’ is an exploration of some alternative perspectives on reality. Her thought provoking portraits offer a window into the unique realities experienced by Theresa and nine other people who have been affected by a psychotic `disorder’ such as bipolar or schizophrenia. Alexa Wright’s aim is two fold. “One is bringing issues of mental health into the public domain, she said. ‘But the other is to look at our notion of reality. What is reality, we all operate in society on the basis that what we consider real is the same as what someone else might. But it’s interesting to look at a reality that only one person is privy to but for them is absolutely real when they are experiencing it.’

Read the full article here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-17618459

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Blank Identification seminar, Bergen, Norway, April 28th

April 28th 2012, 1-5pm
Hardaland art Centre, Klosteret 17, PB 1745 Nordnes, 5816 Bergen, Norway

In conjunction with the exhibition A neutral, flexible structure by Martin Torgersrud, Hardaland Art Centre is staging a seminar, Blank Identification, touching on the themes of photography, abstraction and economy. The seminar comprises four lectures, and an open discussion with the audience of the ideas put forward by our guests, with all the digressions and associations that come with it. 

Speakers:
Morten Torgersrud, artist, Kirkenes, Norway/Stockholm, Sweden
Matt Packer, Lewis Glucksman Gallery, University College Cork
Arne Skaug Olsen, art critic, Bergen
David Cunningham, Institute for Modern and Contemporary Culture, London

The seminar will be held in English. Participation is free, but due to limited avaliable seats we encourage everyone interested to notify us before April 25th to hks [at] kunstsenter.no.
The seminar is supported by Bergen Academy of Art and Design.

Further details at: http://www.kunstsenter.no/en/seminar-tom-identifisering

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Alan Morrison Royal Society lecture, April 27

Sir George Cayley (1773-1857), the Father of Flight

Friday 27th April, 1.00-.200 pm
The Royal Society, Carlton House Terrace, 6-9 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AG

This Royal Society lecture discusses Cayley’s pioneering aviation work, and his roles as an inventor and as founder of the Royal Polytechnic Institution in Regent Street. Cayley’s work will be related to the scientific and intellectual milieu of the day, and to debates regarding the public engagement with science and technology. The lecture will be delivered by Alan Morrison, who is an Honorary Fellow in the IMCC at the University of Westminster, as well as a Lemelson Center Research Associate at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. He curated the exhibition ‘Sir George Cayley: the Father of Flight’ shown at the RAF Museum Hendon.

The lecture is open and free to the public – there is no need to book, and seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

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Reminder: Whitechapel Salon with Peter Osborne on Money, Thurs 5th April

Thursday 5 April 2012, 7pm
Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1
Price: £7.00 / £5.00 concessions (includes free glass of wine).

This season’s Whitechapel Salon organised by the IMCC in collaboration with the Whitechapel Gallery is on ‘Cultures of Capitalism’.  The fifth salon turns to that social and economic form at the very heart of capitalist cultures: Money. In the light of contemporary crises in financial capitalism, Professor Peter Osborne, Director of the Centre for Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University, and author of books including The Politics of Time, Philosophy in Cultural Theory, and Conceptual Art, will be in discussion with David Cunningham about money, cultural form, and the nature of the ‘real’ today.

Book your ticket at:
http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/shop/index.php/fuseaction/shop.product/product_id/1160

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Sports and the City conference, April 24-25

Sports and the City
April 24-25 2012
Fyvie Hall, University of Westminster, 309 Regent St, London W1B

Organised by our friends in the Department of Social and Historical Studies at Westminster, the University is staging a two-day conference on sport and the city. The conference will also include a reception to launch Mark Clapson’s book An Education in Sport: Competition, Communities and Identities at the University of Westminster Since 1864, which constitutes the second part of the University’s ‘History Project’.

The conference costs £60 for both days, including lunch and drinks reception. A student rate of £30 is also available.

To register please contact Anna McNally at archive@westminster.ac.uk and details will be given for credit card payment.

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Publication of Alexa Wright’s A View From Inside

We are delighted to announce the publication of Alexa Wright’s book A View From Inside from White-Card. Including essays from Graham Thornicroft and Jeanne Randolph, A View From Inside challenges our preconceptions about what constitutes reality. The ten portrait photos in the book draw on the principles of eighteenth-century portrait painting to give form to the unique realities encountered by different people during psychotic episodes.

The book is published to accompany a series of ten framed photographic portraits (76 x 100 cm / 30 x 40 inches) designed for gallery exhibition.
RRP £22.00
ISBN: 978-0-9571558-0-0

For more information visit: www.alexawright.com

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China in Britain: Film #2, May 31st

China in Britain #2. Film

Thursday May 31st 2012, 9.45 am – 4.45 pm
Room 451, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2UW  

This is the second in a series of colloquia organised as part of China in Britain: Myths and Realities, an AHRC-funded research network project to investigate changing conceptions of China and Chineseness in Britain, and based at Westminster. The colloquia will connect up the important yet disparate work being done by cultural historians, literary critics, curators, archivists, contemporary artists, film makers and Sino-British organisations. In bringing these specialists together, the project aims to provide a high profile platform for the discursive elaboration of the changing terms of engagement between British and Chinese people and to widen the terms of debate from diaspora studies and simplistic reductions around identity to an inter-disciplinary network of research practice relevant to contemporary debate.

This second event on film will begin with a screening at 10.00am of the 1988 film Soursweet, directed by Mike Newell (most popularly known for his direction of Four Weddings and a Funeral and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire). This will be followed by an afternoon talk from Newall and roundtable discussion (2.30pm).

The day will also include presentations of their film work by Rosa Fong and Lab Ky Mo (12.15pm) and conclude with a paper by Jeffrey Richards (Lancaster University) on ‘Fu Manchu and the Yellow Peril (3.45pm).

RSVP – Places are free but strictly limited so it is essential to register with the project’s Principal Investigator, Anne Witchard, at: anne@translatingchina.info

WEBSITE:  http://www.translatingchina.info

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Exhibiting Video – 23-25 March, University of Westminster

The Institute’s friends and colleagues in the Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media (CREAM) at University of Westminster are organizing a three-day international conference this coming weekend on ‘exhibiting video’, please see below for full details:

Exhibiting Video – International Conference
Date: 23, 24 and 25 March, 2012
Venue: University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London, W1B 2UW

To coincide with the new David Hall Ambika P3 commission ‘1001 TV Sets (End Piece)’ 1972-2012 the Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media (CREAM) of the University of Westminster is convening Exhibiting Video, a three-day event considering issues central to the display of video art. Bringing together notable artists, curators and writers the event will provide a forum for a number of related questions:

· On what terms has the rise of video in contemporary arts taken place?
· How do notions of medium specificity and site specificity shape video art work made for exhibition?
· What is the legacy of analogue video technology in the digital age?
· How do our museums and galleries understand video art?

Confirmed participants include:
Mark Bartlett, Irit Batsry, Amanda Beech, Steven Ball, Steven Bode, Margarida Brito Alves, David Campany, Stuart Comer, Sean Cubitt, Shezad Dawood, Catherine Elwes, Solange Oliveira Farkas, Terry Flaxton, David Hall, Adam Kossof, Anya Lewin, Adam Lockhart, Chris Meigh-Andrews, Stuart Moore, Marquard Smith, Kayla Parker, Margherita Sprio, Minou Norouzi, Stephen Partridge, Ken Wilder and Lori Zippay

To register please go to:
http://www.westminster.ac.uk/research/a-z/cream/events/exhibiting-video-conference

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Rural Idyll in Contemporary Irish Fiction and Film seminar

Wednesday 21st March, 1.15pm – 2.30pm
Room 257, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street

Aisling McKeown (University of Westminster)
Once Upon A Time In The West: the Rural Idyll in Contemporary Irish Fiction and Film’

Abstract: In 1952, John Wayne starred in John Ford’s film The Quiet Man, set in the west of Ireland. Playing a returned Irish-American emigrant, rather than his more customary role as that potent symbol of the American west, the cowboy, Wayne cut a swathe  through Ireland’s wild landscape. The film projected an image of Ireland as a rural idyll, populated by fiery yet charming natives. Contemporary film-makers and writers, unless being deliberately ironic, tend to avoid such clichéd treatment of rural Ireland. Combining discourses of tradition and modernity, their representations reflect the  socio-cultural evolution of this remote location, which inspired Yeats and Synge over a century ago. This paper will trace the development of these representations and discuss the blend of mythology and realism that underpins the work of today’s writers as they address such themes as immigration, identity and belonging.

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