News

Gothic Sounds of the 1790s seminar with Emma McEvoy, Feb 19th 2020

Written by on Monday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Wednesday 19th February, 5.00-7.00 pm
UG04, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW

Gothic Sounds of the 1790s
Emma McEvoy (University of Westminster) 

Gothic novels of the 1790s tend to be noisy affairs, filled with references to sounds and music. They are punctuated by echoing footsteps, thunder and distant screams. Heroines play the lyre and harp, monks chant, peasants pipe and dance, heroes might even serenade (though this turns out to be a morally suspect practice). This unprecedented attention to sound stems from the Gothic novel’s close relationship to theatre. In this paper, Emma McEvoy will argue that we need to learn to hear the Gothic novels of the 1790s. She will look at the part played by music and sound in a number of works of the period and identify the influential, but contrasting, approaches to sound in the novels of Ann Radcliffe and Matthew Lewis. Whereas Radcliffe constructs something that might be said to resemble a soundscape, Lewis’s novel structures itself through a soundtrack. Finally, in an attempt to recover the lost aural dimension of these texts, Emma will bring along excerpts from the Gothic musical theatre of the period to listen to. Expect to hear works by Thomas Busby, Lewis’s collaborator, the Irish tenor Michael Kelly, and Lewis himself.

Emma McEvoy is Senior Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Westminster. She is author of Gothic Tourism (Palgrave 2015) and co-editor (with Catherine Spooner) of the Routledge Companion to Gothic (2007). She also wrote the introduction and notes for the Oxford World Classics edition of Matthew Lewis’s The Monk.

All welcome, but guests from outside Westminster should RSVP Frankie Hines: frankie.hines@my.westminster.ac.uk OR Baptiste Danel: baptiste.danel@my.westminster.ac.uk

Sink Without Trace at the Westminster Difference Festival

Written by on Monday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Thursday 27 February 2020, 18.00 – 20.00 pm
Fyvie Hall, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW

Sink Without Trace: Investigating the Truth about Migrant Deaths at Sea

Part of the University of Westminster’s annual Difference Festival, this roundtable discussion will consider the misreporting of the deaths that have been occurring amongst migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea towards Europe by media and governments, the widespread use of misleading statistics and the lack of regulation relating to the recovery and identification of migrant’s bodies. This will be the first in a series of discussions aimed at creating a document of agreed truths on the subject of migrant deaths at sea. Leading experts from NGO’s, media organisations and government bodies will be invited to investigate the myths surrounding the subject and to discuss possible solutions.

Speakers include, Marchu Girma (Women for Refugee Women), Laura Padoan (External Relations Officer, UNHCR), Lorenzo Pezzani (Forensic Oceanography, Goldsmiths), Maurice Stierl (Watch the Med, Alarm Phone and University of Warwick), Daniel Trilling (Journalist, The Guardian).

The event will be followed by a drinks reception. Book your free tickets here.

How gays almost became French: Republican homophobia, queer banalisation, and the limits of sexual nationalism seminar, Thursday 13 February 2020

Written by on Monday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Thursday 13th February 2020, 5.30-7.00 pm
Fyvie Hall, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW

How gays almost became French: Republican homophobia, queer banalisation, and the limits of sexual nationalism
Sébastien Chauvin (University of Lausanne)

Sébastien Chauvin is an associate professor at the Social Sciences Institute (ISS) of the University of Lausanne (Switzerland), where he is also the co-director of the Centre for Gender Studies (CEG). He previously taught at the University of Amsterdam, Paris 1-Panthéon Sorbonne University and the University of Chicago. His many publications include (with Arnaud Lerch) Sociology of Homosexuality, and, in English, contributions to Public Culture and Work, Employment and Society.

Part of the series French Politics: A Neighbour’s ‘History of the Present’, co-organised by the IMCC in collaboration with our friends in the Centre for the Study of Democracy, and with the support of the French Embassy and the Political Studies Association.

Free to attend, but booking via eventbrite is essential.

Fundubbing: From Traditions to Convergence Culture seminar, Feb 13th 2020

Written by on Monday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Thursday 13 February 2020, 5.00-6.00 pm
Room 501, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2UW

Fundubbing: From Traditions to Convergence Culture
Dr Rocio Banos Pinero (UCL)

Organised by our colleagues in Modern Languages, the aim of this presentation is to delve into the phenomenon of fundubbing by investigating its origins and situating it in its current context. Fundubbing is here understood as the practice of replacing the original dialogue track of an audiovisual text with another track containing a mostly new script created with humoristic purposes. Although this practice is often associated with online media and current technical developments, this paper will show fundubbing as an old innovation, used in the past to entertain audiences, but also as a form of subversion and a political act. The goal is thus to provide an overview of this cultural phenomenon, from its origins in the 1930s and 1940s, often involving the dubbing of relinquished audiovisual texts (e.g. silent movies or audiovisual material produced within cultures afar), to the current times, where virtually any user with basic technical knowledge can manipulate audiovisual content (adding subtitles or an audio track, for instance) and upload it online to be shared with the rest of the world. By doing so, this paper reflects on how dubbing has been used as a site of experimentation and innovation, as well as an ideological tool, across time and space, from traditions to convergence culture.

Chaired by Lindsay Bywood

Photography Beyond the Image symposium, April 25th 2020

Written by on Tuesday, posted in Conference, Event, News (No comments yet)

Saturday 25 April 2020, 9.45am – 4.45pm
University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW

Photography Beyond the Image

Recent years have seen photographic studies move beyond the analysis of the visual product. From a focus on photographs as the privileged points of access for studying photography, thus supporting a predominant understanding of the medium as a representational tool, the field is today embracing a more holistic approach. This has brought photography into a much needed interdisciplinary and intermedial analytical environment, and alerted us to the social, cultural and commercial entanglements that shape and are shaped by photographic practices. This one-day symposium hosted by the Institute for Modern and Contemporary Culture seeks to examine these intellectual trends by reflecting on their postulates, methodologies and future directions.

Speakers:
Professor Geoffrey Batchen (Oxford)
Dr Geoffrey Belknap (National Science and Media Museum)
Professor Patrizia Di Bello (Birkbeck)
Professor Elizabeth Edwards (Victoria and Albert Museum Research Institute and De Montfort University)
Professor Steve Edwards (Birkbeck)
Professor Michelle Henning (University of Liverpool)
Dr Nicoletta Leonardi (Brera Academy of Fine Arts, Milan)
Dr Gil Pasternak (De Montfort University)
Dr Annebella Pollen (University of Brighton)
Convened by Dr Sara Dominici (IMCC, University of Westminster)

Full programme available here.

The event is free and open to all, but spaces are limited and booking essential. Tickets here.

Homes and Homelessness in NYC Poetry seminar, February 5th 2020

Written by on Monday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Wednesday 5th February, 5.00-7.00 pm
UG04, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW

‘A fragile system, easy to subvert’: Homes and Homelessness in NYC Poetry
Rona Cran (University of Birmingham) 

This talk emerges from research into how poets dwell creatively in new York, into how they dwell politically, and into what is means to dwell queerly, to offer alternative modes of being/dwelling/thinking in New York, alternative models of private space, and, beyond that, alternative models of the history of New York. Laurent Berlant and Elizabeth Freeman, in Michael Warner’s Fear of a Queer Planet, reveal the ways in which AIDS activist art collective Gran Fury ‘transform[ed] the passive public space of New York into a zone of political pedagogy’. Following them, this talk will explore the presentation of housing, homes and homelessness in the poetry of four queer New York poets – Langston Hughes, James Schuyler, Audre Lorde and Eileen Myles – in order to think about the ways in which they transform the city’s private spaces into similar zones of political pedagogy, reframing the idea of home and of what it means to be rooted, un-rooted and sometimes uprooted.

Rona Cran is Lecturer in Twentieth-Century American Literature and Co-Director of the American and Canadian Studies Centre at the University of Birmingham. Her first book was entitled Collage in Twentieth-Century Art, Literature, and Culture: Joseph Cornell, William Burroughs, Frank O’Hara, and Bob Dylan (Ashgate, 2014), exploring the influence of Europe’s artist-émigrés on New York City culture from 1912 onwards. She is currently writing her second monograph, Multiple Voices: New York City Poetry, 1950-1995, which combines close reading, creative writing and archival research to explore the relationship between poetry and the urban, political and social changes that the city underwent during this time, arguing that socially-situated poetry offers particular sites of resistance.

All welcome, but guests from outside Westminster should RSVP Frankie Hines: frankie.hines@my.westminster.ac.uk OR Baptiste Danel: baptiste.danel@my.westminster.ac.uk

On the Cunning of National Reason: French Postcolonial Disputes over Race, Gender and Equality seminar, January 30th 2020

Written by on Tuesday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Thursday 30 January 2020, 5.30 – 7.00 pm
Fyvie Hall, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW

On the Cunning of National Reason: French Postcolonial Dispute over Race, Gender and Equality
Silyane Larcher (CNRS/IRIS)

Silyane Larcher was born and educated in Martinique. She is a tenured Research Fellow at the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) in political sciences and works on the history of citizenship in the French Atlantic (post)colonial context, with a particular interest in the tensions between race, gender, and universalism.  She is the author of The Other Citizen: The French Republican Ideal and the West Indies after Slavery [French title: L’autre citoyen. L’idéal républicain et les Antilles après l’esclavage, 2014] and co-edited, with F. Germain , Black French Women and the Struggle for Equality, 1848-2016 (2018). Her next book will be about the historical and sociopolitical conditions of contemporary Afrofeminism in contemporary continental France.

Part of the series French Politics: A Neighbour’s ‘History of the Present’, co-organised by the IMCC in collaboration with our friends in the Centre for the Study of Democracy, and with the support of the French Embassy and the Political Studies Association.

Free to attend, but booking via eventbrite is essential.

Environmental Racism in the US at the British Academy, Thursday 6th February

Written by on Tuesday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Thursday 6th February 2020, 18.30 – 19.45
The British Academy, 10-11 Carlton House Terrace, London, SW1Y 5AH

Environmental Racism in the United States

Environmental racism is on the rise in the United States, with minority and impoverished communities much more likely to live near polluters and breathe polluted air. In this event, the IMCC’s own Lucy Bond and Jessica Rapson (Cultural and Creative Industries, KCL) will draw on their recent research to highlight how the tourist and heritage industry in the American Gulf States (Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas) is helping to conceal environmental racism as well as being complicit in the air and water pollution crisis that is blighting predominantly African American neighbourhoods.

Booking required
£5, £3 concessions

This event is part of the British Academy’s season on Sustainable Futures 

Lorna Piatti-Farnell on ‘Evil, Reborn: Remaking Disney Villains and the Gothic Intertext’, Weds 11th December 2019

Written by on Monday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Wednesday 11th December, 5.00-7.00 pm
Room 152-153 (Cayley Room), University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW

Evil, Reborn: Remaking Disney Villains and the Gothic Intertext
Lorna Piatti-Farnell (Auckland University of Technology) 

In an age when the film industry has given us a prolific stream of remakes, sequels, prequels and other creative off-shoots, it is not surprising to see Disney jump enthusiastically on the retelling bandwagon. Disney has recently developed their own distinctive form of ‘re-make’: the live-action re-make. Within this, Disney villains have often taken central stage. Aesthetically, the roots of Disney’s villains can be traced through fairy tales, Gothic literature and horror. The twenty-first century, however, has added a layer of complication. Narratives of redemption are constantly associated with well-known villains, often changing or reshuffling both physical and perceived moral characteristics that were once seen to be untouchable. In the contemporary era, animated Disney villains cannot be considered as singular entities, but must be perceived as intertextual figures that are continuously remade and reborn across narrative and media spectrums.

Lorna Piatti-Farnell is Director of the Popular Culture Research Centre at AUT. Her many books include Consuming Gothic: Food and Horror in Film (Palgrave 2017) and The Vampire in Contemporary Popular Literature (Routledge 2014).

All welcome, but guests from outside Westminster should RSVP Frankie Hines: frankie.hines@my.westminster.ac.uk OR Baptiste Danel: baptiste.danel@my.westminster.ac.uk

CANCELLED: Fabien Jobard, “Liberal, Authoritarian, or Police State? Defining the French State According to its Police” seminar, Weds 4th December 2019

Written by on Tuesday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Due to a major strike in France, including on the French railways, we are sorry to have to cancel tonight’s event with Fabien Jobard. We will try to reschedule this session of the seminar series “French Politics: A Neighbour’s History of the Present” next year. Apologies for any inconvenience. 

Wednesday 4 December 2019, 6.00 – 7.30 pm
The Boardroom, first floor, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW

Liberal, Authoritarian, or Police State? Defining the French State According to its Police
Fabien Jobard (CNRS / Centre for Sociological Research on Law and Penal Institutions)

Fabien Jobard specialises in matters concerning the police in France and Germany. He is a research director at the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) and at the Centre for Sociological Research on Law and Penal Institutions (CESDIP). He also is a visiting professor at Louvain Global College of Law. He recently published “Transformation of State’s Use of Force in Europe” in Desmond King & Patrick Le Galès (ed.), Reconfiguring European States in Crisis (Oxford University Press, 2017) and, with Daniel Schönpflug, Politische Gewalt im urbanen Raum (De Gruyter, 2019). Fabien Jobard is also the co-author, with Dave Waddington and Mike King, of the book Rioting in the UK and France (Willan, 2009).

Part of the series French Politics: A Neighbour’s ‘History of the Present’, co-organised by the IMCC in collaboration with our friends in the Centre for the Study of Democracy, and with the support of the French Embassy and the Political Studies Association.

Free to attend, but booking via eventbrite is essential.

Processing Memory: Plantation Pasts and Petrochemical Futures on America’s Gulf Coast seminar, Weds 27th November 2019

Written by on Monday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Wednesday 27th November, 5.00-7.00 pm
Room 152-153 (Cayley Room), University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW

Processing Memory: Plantation Pasts and Petrochemical Futures on America’s Gulf Coast
Lucy Bond (IMCC, Westminster) and Jessica Rapson (King’s College London)

Historically America’s premier region for the production of sugar and cotton, the Gulf of Mexico is now dominated by the oil industry. Many of the African-American communities in this region are descendants of workers who were enslaved on plantations and exploited as sharecroppers during the Jim Crow era. Today, structural racism continues to dominate life and, frequently, determine premature death in this area, as petrochemical manufacturers displace communities, pollute air and water, and destroy the wetlands that protect the coastline from hurricanes and flooding. Drawing on our recent fieldwork and interviews with environmental activists, heritage entrepreneurs and legal practitioners, this paper interrogates the historical imaginaries that have framed Louisiana’s transition from plantation to petrochemical economy. The paper explores the oil industry’s impact on heritage and tourist narratives in a cross-section of Louisiana, which stretches from Morgan City to Garyville, highlighting practices that challenge the petrochemical industry’s toxic and violent domination of the Gulf Coast.

All welcome, but guests from outside Westminster should RSVP Frankie Hines: frankie.hines@my.westminster.ac.uk OR Baptiste Danel: baptiste.danel@my.westminster.ac.uk

Ninon Grangé, The State and the Exception: Existence, Fiction, and Reality, November 14 2019

Written by on Thursday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Thursday 14 October 2019, 5.30 – 7.00 pm
Room UG05, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW

The State and the Exception: Existence, Fiction, and Reality
Ninon Grangé (University Paris 8 Vincennes-Saint-Denis/LLCP)

The recent evolution of the state of emergency in France and the confusion between war on terrorism and social repression have required that we define the state of exception anew. The structure of the so-called “as if” (“as if we were at war”) seems to have pervaded our representations and our laws. Thus, the traditional challenges faced by the state (État), i.e. its preservation and the risk to collapse, have to be made more complex. The reality of the state should not be mistaken with its existence: it relies on a dialectical relation between power and powerlessness, on the one hand, and on belief and imagination, on the other hand. Through the study of contemporary French politics, the issue of political fictionalism will therefore be tackled.

Ninon Grangé teaches political philosophy at the University Paris 8 Vincennes-Saint-Denis and at the New College of Political Studies (NCEP). Her research focuses on war, political fictions, political identity, and political temporalities. Her publications include Emergency and Terror: The State of Exception, War, and Political Temporalities [French title: L’urgence et l’effroi. L’état d’exception, la guerre et les temps politiques, 2018], Forgetting Civil War? Stasis: Chronicle of a Disappearance [Oublier la guerre civile ? Stasis : chronique d’une disparition, 2015]; Carl Schmitt: Nomos, Law, and Conflict in International Relations [Carl Schmitt: nomos, droit et conflit dans les relations internationale, 2013]; and Of Civil War [De la guerre civile, 2009].

Part of the series French Politics: A Neighbour’s ‘History of the Present’, co-organised by the IMCC in collaboration with our friends in the Centre for the Study of Democracy, and with the support of the French Embassy and the Political Studies Association.

Free to attend, but booking via eventbrite is essential.

A New ‘Form’ of Feminism seminar, Weds 13 November 2019

Written by on Thursday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Wednesday 13th November, 5.00-7.00 pm
Room 152-153 (Cayley Room), University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW

A New ‘Form’ of Feminism: Mary Hays’ Female Biography (1803)
Susan Civale (Canterbury)

The Dissenter and feminist writer, Mary Hays, who is most famous for her scandalous autobiographical fiction The Memoirs of Emma Courtney (1796), has received comparatively less attention for her Female Biography, an epic biographical dictionary that she published in 1803. In her preface to Female Biography, Hays states her aims: ‘My pen has been taken up in the cause, and for the benefit of my own sex. For their improvement, and to their entertainment, my labours have been devoted’. In the six volumes that follow, Hays details the lives of over 300 women from various countries, periods and social backgrounds. She champions women’s achievements and holds up her subjects as complex, flawed women. Recently, critics like Gina Luria Walker, Mary Spongberg and Miriam Wallace have argued for the importance of this text as a contribution to Romantic life writing, historiography and/or feminism. However, one aspect of Female Biography has still received little attention: its form. Though organised alphabetically, the entries seem chaotic, repetitive and uneven. This paper will explore how the encylopaedic form of the book produces several important effects, including alphabetical juxtapositions that reveal previously, intersecting cross-references that ask readers to make connections between entries, and recurring themes that render female experience as circular rather than linear. It will also examine how Hays uses certain entries to speak by proxy. By demonstrating how these formal features operate, the paper will argue that the form of Female Biography links directly to Hays’ feminist project, by cultivating a reinterpretation of women’s roles and representations in history, encouraging active reading practices for her female audience.

Susan Civale is Senior Lecturer at Canterbury Christchurch University. She recently published a monograph titled Romantic Women’s Life Writing: Reputation and Afterlife (Manchester University Press, 2019). This book considers how the publication of women’s ‘private’ lives, through diaries, auto/biographies, letters, and memoirs, influenced their literary afterlives.

All welcome, but guests from outside Westminster should RSVP Frankie Hines: frankie.hines@my.westminster.ac.uk OR Baptiste Danel: baptiste.danel@my.westminster.ac.uk

Unpacking Dickens’ Pictures from Italy seminar, October 30th 2019

Written by on Monday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Wednesday 30th October, 5.00-7.00 pm
Room 152-153 (Cayley Room), University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW

A Thousand Words: Unpacking Dickens’ Pictures From Italy
Peter Orford (Buckingham)

In July 1844 Charles Dickens travelled with his family to Italy, basing himself in Genoa for a year. His adventures abroad were captured in his letters home, subsequently transformed into a newspaper series ‘Travelling Letters’ in 1846, and ultimately collected and bound into Pictures From Italy later that year. The final travel narrative, as it now exists, is therefore removed several times from Dickens’ initial experience up to two years earlier. In exploring the legitimacy of Pictures and its earlier incarnations to determine what constitutes the ‘true’ version of this text, the seminar will pose wider questions about authorial intention, editorial intervention and the elusiveness of creating a definitive edition.

Dr Peter Orford is Course Director for the MA by Research in Charles Dickens Studies at the University of Buckingham. He is the author of The Mystery of Edwin Drood: Charles Dickens’ unfinished novel and our endless attempts to end it (2018) and has been commissioned by Oxford University Press to prepare a new edition of Pictures From Italy.

All welcome, but guests from outside Westminster should RSVP Frankie Hines: frankie.hines@my.westminster.ac.uk OR Baptiste Danel: baptiste.danel@my.westminster.ac.uk

Matt Charles on Coleridge’s Bulls, Weds 16th October 2019

Written by on Monday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Wednesday 16th October, 5.00-7.00 pm
Room 201, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW

Examining Coleridge’s Bulls: Humour, Fancy and the Political Imagination
Matthew Charles (IMCC / University of Westminster)

‘He’ll regret it till his dying day, if ever he lives that long’. The English Romantic Samuel Taylor Coleridge defined the bull, a type of humorous utterance, as ‘a mental juxtaposition of incongruous ideas with the sensation, but without the sense, of connection’. Coleridge repeatedly returns to this linguistic form in his notebooks and published writings between 1801 and 1817, with the bull coming to acquire a profound, albeit ambiguous, place within the aesthetics, philosophy and psychology of Coleridge’s attempts to define Romanticism, specifically in relation to his distinction between fantasy/imagination and allegory/symbol. Drawing on later modernist criticism of the false distinction between allegory and symbol, this talk proposes a comparable reconsideration of the devaluation of fancy in Coleridge’s broader ‘politics of the imagination’ and so a re-evaluation of the bull’s humour.

Matthew Charles is Senior Lecturer in the School of Humanities at the University of Westminster, and author of the forthcoming Modernism Between Benjamin and Goethe (Bloomsbury 2019).

All welcome, but guests from outside Westminster should RSVP Frankie Hines: frankie.hines@my.westminster.ac.uk OR Baptiste Danel: baptiste.danel@my.westminster.ac.uk

Opening evening for Techne doctoral applicants, Weds 6th November

Written by on Wednesday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Wednesday 6th November 2019, 5.30 – 8.00 pm
University of Westminster, 115 New Cavendish Street, London W1W 6UW

Techne: AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership
Open Evening for Applicants for 2020 entry

Looking to do a PhD in 2020? Come and meet with academics, including those affiliated with the IMCC, to find out about the AHRC-funded techne doctoral studentships and programme of development, training and networking opportunities. Academic staff from all techne universities will be available to discuss your research proposal. We can’t guarantee an expert in your specific subject area, but all will be experienced in guiding doctoral applications. Administrators will also be on hand to advise on the application process.

For further details on the techne scheme see: http://www.techne.ac.uk/

Book a place at the open evening via this eventbrite link. Please register for one of the 3 sessions at 5:30pm, 6:15pm and 7pm. There will be refreshments available throughout the evening.

Sophie Wahnich on the Yellow Vests, French Politics Today, Thursday 10th October, 5.30

Written by on Wednesday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

Thursday 10 October 2019, 5.30 – 7.00 pm
Room UG05, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW

Democracy Taken in Vice: Understanding the ‘Yellow Vests’ Event
Sophie Wahnich (CNRS/EHESS)

Sophie Wahnich is a Director of Research in History and Political Science at the French Institute of Scientific Research (CNRS) and the Director of the Interdisciplinary Institute of Anthropology of the Contemporary at the EHESS. She is a regular columnist for the daily newspaper Libération. Her work as an academic and public intellectual approaches contemporary issues facing Western democracies (terror, nationalism, globalisation, refugees, war, trauma, religion, collective memory), which she studies alongside the historical achievements and universal ideals of the French Revolution. Her book In Defence of the Terror was translated into English and published by Verso in 2012, with an introduction by Slavoj Zizek.

Part of the series French Politics: A Neighbour’s ‘History of the Present’, co-organised by the IMCC in collaboration with our friends in the Centre for the Study of Democracy, and with the support of the French Embassy and the Political Studies Association.

Free to attend, but booking via eventbrite is essential.

English Literature and Culture research seminar series, Oct – Dec 2019

Written by on Wednesday, posted in Event, News (No comments yet)

The latest series of English Literature and Culture research seminars for Autumn 2019 have now been announced, starting with a paper by the IMCC’s own Matthew Charles.

Wednesday 16th October, 5.00 – 7.00 pm
Room 201, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B

Examining Coleridge’s Bulls: Humour, Fancy and the Political Imagination
Matthew Charles (IMCC/University of Westminster)

Wednesday 30th October, 5.00 – 7.00 pm
Room 152, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B

A Thousand Words: Unpicking Dickens’ Pictures from Italy
Peter Orford (University of Buckingham)

Wednesday 13th November, 5.00 – 7.00 pm
Room 152, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B

A New ‘Form’ of Feminism: Mary Hays’ Female Biography (1803)
Susan Civale (Canterbury)

Wednesday 27th November, 5.00 – 7.00 pm
Room 152, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B

Processing Memory: Heritage, Industry and Environmental Racism in the American Gulf States
Lucy Bond (IMCC/University of Westminster) & Jessica Rapson (KCL)

Wednesday 11th December, 5.00 – 7.00 pm
Room 152, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B

Evil, Reborn: Remaking Disney and the Villain Intertext in Film and Popular Culture
Lorna Piatti-Farnell (Aukland University of Technology)